UniversalGiving Partners with Link TV

By Cheryl Mahoney

Interested in getting an inside look at a school in rural China?  How about a soccer team in Kenya?  (You know you want to watch a program described as “Kenya’s Soap Opera for Social Good”)  Or maybe you’d like to learn about a young man who’s writing an alphabet for his people, as they have never had a written language.

If you’re interested in powerful, personal stories from all over the world, Link TV is a resource you have to explore.  With documentaries and series, Link TV covers issues and highlights cultures many of us aren’t familiar with–but are fascinating to explore.

“The Alphabet Book,” referenced above, is one of my favorite stories.  The documentary tells about the Kalash people, a community of 4,000 living between Pakistan and Afghanistan.  According to local legend, they’re descended from Alexander the Great’s armies!  They preserve a unique culture, ancient pagan traditions, and their own language.  They have an oral tradition of storytelling, but no written language–until now, that is.  Taj Khan is working to create an alphabet for his people, so that their stories and traditions can be preserved in their own language.

That’s just one example of the inspiring stories on Link TV.  And I am so pleased to say that UniversalGiving is working in partnership with Link TV, so that if you’re feeling inspired, you can do something about it.  As you know, UniversalGiving is designed to help people find ways to take action on the causes they care about.  So now, you can watch a documentary about a Kenyan soccer team…and then send a soccer ball to an impoverished child.

So visit Link TV and find out when their programs are airing in your area–or watch them online.  And then look for a way to take action with UniversalGiving.  🙂

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2 thoughts on “UniversalGiving Partners with Link TV

  1. I think this is an awesome partnership for both parties involved. Video is a medium that offers moving action and has the potential to create a powerful effect in viewers, something that may be harder for written media to produce, especially in this time of evolving social media.

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