Good Changes, and Changes that Pretend: “Jacob Zuma Wants to Protect Indigenous Leaders”?

Here’s a blog post from our CEO and founder, Pamela Hawley that talks about the difference between good changes and changes that mean well. 
Dear Living and Giving Readers, it so important we distinguish between good changes, and changes that pretend.  Please read this below — how indigenous leaders are being “protected” In Bantustan– but actually forced there to be quiet and to stem the tide of their voices.
Indigenous people have long been trampled upon, forced out, removed, or killed from their homeland. Here, Bantustans are supposed to be areas of land run by the tribal leader.  Since they have leadership in place that is one of their own, they don’t need a voice. They have a leader who is of their tribe. So they don’t need the vote, they don’t need the right to speak, to voice change, to speak up for better lives.
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Interestingly these new laws are available — but only in English. How many of the indigenous tribal people speak English…..
I share this with you so that all of us can raise the curtain.  When people announce something positive — such as strengthening local leaders — find the there there.  Find out what’s really going on.  Today I share this with you that every person, especially indigenous, must have their important voice.  Spread the word so we can support them to take a stand, and that leaders such as Zuma must be firmly led to change their ways. If enough of us speak, if the world speaks, he can change!   And how important this is, when indigenous people really are the founders of their country…
Keep believing and helping,
Pamela
Jacob Zuma wants to strengthen traditional leaders
Critics say this will let them abuse their people
IN A community hall at the edge of the Kalahari desert, hundreds of Khoisan (also known as Bushmen) have gathered for a hearing on a new bill that could decide who rules them. Several are dressed in animal skins, with quivers of arrows slung across their backs. But despite their obvious interest, they are struggling to learn the details of the Traditional and Khoisan Leadership Bill. Few have seen a copy. It is available only online, and in English.
Even expressing their views is a problem: the parliamentary committee that travelled to the remote Northern Cape province for public hearings late last year arranged no translators for Khoi or San languages, or even for Afrikaans, the local lingua franca. Constance Mogale, the national co-ordinator for the Alliance for Rural Democracy, an activist group, watched the public hearing in Upington and shook her head in dismay. “They’re already trampling on our right to information,” she said.
Critics say the bill re-entrenches the tribal boundaries and leadership structures created by the apartheid regime, which dumped many black people in “Bantustans”, semi-autonomous homelands created to maintain the fiction that blacks did not need the vote because they were governed by a tribal chief, even if they barely knew him. The 17m people now in these areas would have no choice but to live under a traditional authority, which would have powers over land use and could be appointed by the government.
There is no shortage of examples of chiefs putting their own interests before those of their people. South Africa’s anti-corruption ombudsman recently found that in one place, Bapo ba Mogale, in the platinum belt north-west of Johannesburg, at least 600m rand ($45m) has gone missing from mining revenues meant for the community. In Limpopo province, a traditional council has been criticised for letting communal land be used by a mining firm that had given payments to the council. The new bill would give even more power to traditional leaders to make deals on behalf of their people.
For the Khoisan, the earliest surviving inhabitants of South Africa, the bill presents a different set of issues. Pushed off their land by colonists and oppressed under apartheid, their post-1994 appeals for land rights and cultural protection have largely been ignored by the ruling African National Congress. Although the new bill purports to address Khoisan gripes, it ignores the thorny issue of land (one group of Khoisan, in a recently filed court case, claims ownership of the whole of South Africa). And though traditional leaders in the former Bantustans would gain power over land, Khoisan leaders (who currently have no official recognition) would gain jurisdiction only over people. Joseph van Wyk, an organiser with Indigenous First Nation Advocacy South Africa, a non-profit, told the public hearing in Upington that his group objects to the bill because it fails to recognise the Khoisan as the first people of South Africa. But for Jacob Zuma, the president (pictured), the bill is a handy way to empower the rural bigwigs whose electoral support he craves.
This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline “Hail to the chiefs”
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Faith is a Living, Daring Confidence

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times” – Martin Luther 

Faith is a living, daring confidence.  Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God.  And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

He meant it for discussion, but was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration and connection to life. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle.  He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant!  But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

What do you need to take a stand for today?   Join UniversalGiving and support one of our causes to make a difference today.  Click on I Want to Give my 100%! to see which special one we chose for you!

With Gratitude for the Truth,

Pamela

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Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.
Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.
The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university.Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.
In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.
Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture.   In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church.Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.
Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

Top 4 things not to use your interns for

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At UniversalGiving we love our interns and recognize the tremendous amount of value they bring to us. We want all of our interns to experience growth not only as employees but also as human beings during their time with us.

Some of us have been working in the workforce for 20, 30, 40 years plus.  We’ve done a lot of things over our career, step by step, building ourselves and organizations to new levels.  

In your mind, you’ve  worked very hard to advance yourself and your company.  You’ve also rolled up your sleeves thousands of times to help make sure the team can succeed, whether that’s raising a new round of funds, or xeroxing.   Meeting with a millionaire investor, or cleaning the dishes after a team event.   You feel you have paid your dues.

Yet being a part of a company and culture isn’t genuinely driven by that mindset.  Your devotion to work should be because you want to, and would like to help. That sincerity will advance you light years.   Not only will your managers recognize your genuine attitude, but you will feel a sense of integrity within, which is driving you for the right reasons to serve.  

But you might be tempted.  

“I worked so hard!  I need help.  It’s time for the young 18 year old to roll up their sleeves so I can do the important work.”

Part of that is true.  Your interns should want to serve and help in any way they can.   But it can never be your attitude in full.  People of any age deserve to have meaningful opportunities to grow. Provide them an enriching experience that will help them grow as individuals and professionals.

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So here are the top 4 things you shouldn’t ask your intern for:

  1. Go get coffee.  Everyone does this! There is no reason why you can’t get up from your office to go get your coffee and show the team that you are working to provide for yourself—your own caffeine fix!  Please keep in mind as well that as the newer generation is more socially conscious, they may not agree with caffeine or even the type of drink you are having, or even feel it is holistic or organic.  So, where you can you want to avoid any sense of conflict of values.
  2. Xerox.  We all need help with copying, faxing, and it’s okay to ask them to do it.  However, please be mindful that this should be no more than 5-10% of their job.  They are coming there to gain experience, not to press buttons.
  3. Personal errands.  Unless you have an agreement—which usually isn’t the case for college interns that they are doing personal errands for you—that should never be the case.  They are coming there to get work experience, not to pick up your dry cleaning.  Remember, they are an important part of the brand that you are building.  They can post online about anything that concerns them, but more important is that you want to make sure you’ve got a great relationship with them.
  4. Leave them manager-less.  If you are not present, make sure someone is.  They are looking for guidance, they want to grow, and they want to learn.  They don’t have anyone to go-to to ask normal questions about business.  They are going to feel stranded, and their work product will suffer, their experience will suffer, and your relationship with them will be not so strong.

We all need help and there’s nothing wrong with that.  Make sure that you give your interns positive ways to succeed in the workplace and build their resume.

May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

Our CEO Pamela Hawley uses quotes to motivate herself and to teach others. Here is her analysis of a lovely quote from her blog Living and Giving.

President Lincoln advised us… “Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865  Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  And I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves.  Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one us, and then also with all countries.  The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in living rightly every day!

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) served as the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War and in so doing, preserved the Union, ended slavery, strengthened the national government. He promoted rapid modernization of the economy through banks, canals, railroads and tariffs to encourage the building of factories. He is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. 

The second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Lincoln,  Abraham was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s. Married to Mary Todd in 1842, he was an affectionate husband and father of four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Abraham_Lincoln

Devote yourself by volunteering for peace and justice here.

Juliana Margulies – Smile at a Stranger, and the Important Reason Why

This post is by CEO Pamela Hawley’s from her blog Living and Giving.

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.”  — Juliana Margulies

I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile…is simply to give joy.  Give joy to ourselves and to others…it’s one of our main reasons for being.  And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out:  It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness, and lovingkindness.  That’s reason enough. 🙂

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy.  More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards.

“Sail Away from the Safe Harbor”

Here is one of our CEO Pamela Hawley’s favorite quotes from her blog Living and Giving.

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didnt do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us.  And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine.  You inspire.

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835.  In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of antebellum south.  His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes.  He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

Consider leaving your comfort zone by volunteering abroad. Search for an opportunity here.

Impact Investing — Taking Off in Latin America!

So where is one of the greatest hot spots in Impact Investing? Latin America.

What I love about Impact Investing is its emphasis on supporting entrepreneurial people and teams. If you can put a small amount of money aside and invest in one of these enterprises, you can often see great results. However, be prepared that it is a risk and a worthy risk!   Investing is never a 100% guarantee.

Let’s take a look at how this industry continues to scale. In Mexico, we see the greatest leader; nearly $400 million in investments; Brazil nearly $190 million; Colombia: over $50 million.

Considering Impact Investing was coined in the 1990s, that’s a lot of money – showing a lot of awareness! Let’s be grateful for that. Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs showed the rise of Impact Investing in Latin America in their article The Impact Investing Landscape in Latin America.

What People Invest In

Let’s break this down a little bit. Within a two-year period, the number of Impact Investors increased by 25% in Brazil. The major areas they invest in are health, education, agriculture and financial exclusion, according to Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs.

It’s great to see Financial Inclusion, as we usually see more urgent needs such as food or shelter.  It’s nice to see people caring about providing financial training, access to financial services and helping people of the lower class move to the middle class. As we know, this strengthens the entire community.

Now let’s look at Colombia. Colombia’s average deal size is much larger, but the issues focus on mostly Financial Inclusion and Agriculture. These investments in financial and agriculture have the most opportunity to make a difference because they benefit the most vulnerable populations. Therefore, the most popular sectors of Impact Investing rest in Financial Inclusion and Agriculture.

Next up is Mexico, the “Mother of Investing.” Mexico now has 50 investors with 20% of them who invest only in Mexico. That’s impressive! It shows we’re not just exporting people from the US or other more developed countries to plant the idea of impact investing. People are investing on their own soil. It is exactly what we want to see, so they truly own their investments and participate in building their local community.

One of my favorite groups is the National Institute for Entrepreneurship  LINK which focuses on increasing Entrepreneurship in Mexico. Here is the astounding number: both from national and international investments, there is more that $7 billion dollars being invested. And true to the importance of local people playing a strong role, the local investors are the primary investors. That’s because the know their turf, they know their land, and they know what will work. A great example.

A success story from Impact Investing in Mexico is through a company called ClickOnero. Click Onero uses SMS messages and social networking to spread promotions of companies, such as Coca-Cola, to a wide list of users. The users clicked the “Like” button to companies’ promotions, and in exchange, received points that could be used for SMS or cellular prepaid airtime. Why is this important? Well, it helps companies advertise, but also helps the “liker.” They have their cell phone costs reduced, which is often important to their livelihood in selling crops in the market.  You’re reducing their cost of doing business, making their businesses more profitable and reducing their living costs. This makes for a more successful life.This company has done a great job and has been growing consistently since 2009.

So that’s your crash course in Impact Investing in Latin America. We are also seeing it grow and also increase in Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia and Nicaragua.  If you’re global and reading this, maybe you can set aside a small amount to invest in your local community. You might be the next investor!

Think Big and With A Big Heart,

Pamela 🙂

Source:

“The Impact Investing Landscape in Latin America.” Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs. Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs (ANDE), Latin American Private Equity & Venture Capital Association (LAVCA), and LGT Impact Ventures, Aug. 2016. Web.